Choosing A School For Your Disabled Kid

Knowing the benefits of the many different school systems available whenever you move from one place to another is key if you want to provide your children with the kind of advantages they need to thrive in a rapidly changing world, but what was an already difficult decision for a normal child becomes nearly impossible if your child has special needs. So what should you do if your child is disabled or needs more attention than the other children in the neighborhood? Well, luckily there are systems in place to help you out.

You can choose to enroll in an online school, but there are disadvantages to doing so, especially if your child has a behavioral disorder which precipitates a personalized, one on one approach. You can also choose to homeschool, if you know you can provide the right education to meet your child’s needs. Most parents find this a substantial challenge, and it should only be undertaken if you’re sure you aren’t doing more harm than good. Seek professional support before you try. It’s a lot more likely that you’ll need the guidance of an institution or individual professionally accustomed to your child’s needs.

Magnet schools are public schools that cater to kids who are disabled. Unlike most traditional schools, they specialize in certain areas or provide a focus in an area where your child may struggle, such as math or science. Magnet schools are prone to unfortunate long waiting lists, and if the particular magnet school you really want is located in a different school district, then transportation could become a major issue. With every pro, there’s a con.

Charter schools represent another more controversial option, and it’s up to you if you want to take the chance on this one. Although they do offer smaller classes that allow your child a more personalized experience, they are run by groups that may not get adequate funding for children with disabilities, and if the government finds that standards aren’t met, the school can be abruptly shut down. If this happens, your children will need to transition to a different school with different teachers, and that can hinder the learning process a lot more for a disabled child.

There do exist private schools that offer special services for students that have learning or attention problems as part of their disability, and these are especially good for all-around, comprehensive learning. Because all the children in these schools are in the same boat (they all have special needs) there is potentially less bullying, while the culture itself is adapted to meet all of their needs. The problem for most parents is expense, even though this probably offers the best solution to the problem of choosing a school. There are some scholarships available to help pay for the inflated expenses, however.

Ultimately, what you choose for your child depends on his or her needs and the level of support that can be provided from all sides.