Essential Tips To Teach Your Child To Read

One of the most important steps in early childhood development is the introduction of reading skills. Once the road to mastering this has begun, the entirety of their future education and social success will be unlocked. It can’t be overstated or exaggerated just how integral the ability to read truly is. With that in mind, here are some essential tips to teach your child to read:

1 – Start With The Alphabet And Its Sounds

Simply learning the alphabet and how each letter sounds is the first block upon which full reading comprehension can be built. Introduce all of the letters in order, but individually. The old song that teaches the alphabet may be useful, but the manner in which it strings the L, M, N, O, and P together can be confusing. Go over this every single day until your child can recognize every letter and its basic sounds without any help.

2 – Introduce The Left to Right Concept

Once the letters and how they relate to sounds has become familiar, it’s time to start introducing actual words and how they are arranged together. You can’t overlook the simple left to right concept, however. It’s important to break down the process into its simplest parts. A child looking at a paragraph for the first time might not know where to start; illustrating the usefulness of simply starting from the top left and working their way across the page can be a huge turning point.

3 – Have Them Follow Along With You

After all of these early steps have been established, you should be sure to read to your child and actually have them follow along word by word. You can point to every single word in the sentence together as you work on each page. Go as slowly as you need to and work your way up to a more natural pace. Early familiarity with a lot of essential words can be absorbed this way.

4 – Illustrate How Words Relate To One Another

Finally, that familiarity can then be used as a jumping point for other words as well. Teach your child about consonants and vowels and how words that rhyme often relates. Examples include simple words like “box” and “fox”. After accumulating enough words that seem to connect to one another in basic ways, reading alone will soon be much easier. Teaching your child synonyms will help expand their vocabulary. For example, another word for a lawyer is an attorney. It will all start to fall into place from there!