The Similarities And Differences Between Nearsightedness And Farsightedness

Of all the eye problems from which human beings might suffer, near and farsightedness are perhaps the more prevalent. People get diagnosed with one or both of those problems almost every day. If you’ve heard people refer to these disorders but have no idea what they are, then you’re not alone.

Nearsightedness and farsightedness are perhaps the most well-studied eye problems. Thanks to this fact, there are a number of corrective tools and procedures for the problem. However, understanding how those work depends on understanding the difference between the two.

How Are Nearsightedness And Farsightedness Similar?

Both of these eye disorders come from a similar problem. Namely, they are both refractory issues. What does that mean?

When the human eye is hit by light (or as most people call it “seeing”), the pupil takes that light in and reflects it against the back of the eye. The retina then processes it, and the brain puts a picture together. This is how humans see.

With nearsightedness and farsightedness, the light doesn’t reflect properly. Since the light doesn’t reflect properly, vision becomes distorted. It’s much like when a flashlight or another light bulb gets dirty. The light can’t shine properly and instead shines at different strengths.

How Are Nearsightedness And Farsightedness Different?

At a very basic level, the answer is simple. One causes you to have difficulty seeing at close range, the other causes you to have difficulty seeing at further ranges.

You’ve probably seen someone who’s nearsighted before. When they aren’t wearing glasses, they’ll hold books and other objects further away. This is so that they can see it more clearly since objects close to them appear blurry.

How does this happen? It can be caused by a number of events. Physical damage to the eye can cause it, but in general, the cause is age. As humans get older, the eye begins to dry out and lose its shape. As the shape is lost, the light doesn’t focus the way it’s supposed to.

Farsightedness is similar, but the other side of the coin. When someone is farsighted (sometimes called hyperopia), things far away become blurry. This is caused by a flattening of the cornea or an incorrect curvature of the lens.

As you can see, both of these disorders are caused by the eyes becoming irregularly shaped. This is why there are so many ways to help treat these problems while on Medicaid or any other type of medical plan.

How To Treat Myopia And Hyperopia

The most common way to fix these disorders is via corrective eyewear. Glasses are designed to either adjust how the light hits the eyes or simply magnify the thing in front of the person (such as with reading glasses). Corrective eyewear has been around for decades, so by this point, it’s essentially perfected technology.

There are also some surgeries that can correct these problems. Some are safe, others are not. You should speak with your eye doctor before undergoing any surgical treatments.

At the end of the day, millions of people all over the world live with one of these two problems. As long as you wear corrective lenses, you shouldn’t have any drop in your quality of life.

This video does a great job displaying the differences between near and farsightedness: